With iOS 7 Apple Needs to Change its Philosophy

WWDC 2013Apple needs to prove that it can still wow us – even the average Apple user will tell you this. But tomorrow’s Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) keynote will be about much more than software or hardware – it’s about a philosophy. With the long-awaited iOS 7 redesign and iRadio looming, there will still likely be one important feature missing within these products: making them available for everyone. Apple’s closed philosophy has served it well over the years, but other competitors such as Google, have made their apps available on iOS. Google knows that it can’t win the mobile war by ignoring iOS – the same is especially true of Apple regarding Android’s more than 70 percent market share. Android is just too big to ignore and Apple needs to embrace it. Continue reading

Why Google Play’s Suite of Apps Need to be Available for iOS

Play MusicAndroid is a platform that keeps users in the Google universe – but Android does not necessarily make money on its own for Google. In fact, whether you own a Nexus device or something different, Google is probably less concerned with individual device sales and more focused on how each device operates in connection with Google Play and its other services across a wide market share – because that’s where the money is. This is why Google should focus Google Play and its apps (Play Music, Books, Magazines, and Movies & TV) in iOS’s direction.
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How Android’s Fragmentation Actually Helps Google

Most of the people who complain about Android’s fragmentation, probably bought the wrong Android device. Because to be honest, Android’s fragmentation really doesn’t hurt Google, it actually helps. When looking at the early years of Android, where stock versions of the OS were just down right ugly, modulated versions like HTC Sense, Motoblur, and TouchWiz actually saved Android. It allowed people to not only select from different hardware, but also choose unique versions of the OS under the same platform. All that mattered to Google was that they funneled into Google Play (formerly called Android Market). Because Android is basically free, getting more people into Google Play is how Google makes money. Continue reading

3 Solutions That Could Save Chrome OS

Chromebooks suffer from the same problem plaguing most products that arrive before the market or infrastructure is readily available to support them. Many may feel boxed in with a product that has to maintain a complete reliance on the cloud – and although the Internet has done its best to expand into almost every corner – it’s still not completely ready. Chromebooks may be the future, but until the Internet is as abundant as electricity – and perhaps more abundant – the platform will struggle. There is still hope however, so here’s three things that could help. Continue reading

3 Features Google Music Needs to Fix to Compete with iTunes

Google is trying desperately to get you to use their music service – which has been available for over a year now and out of Beta for seven months. There are several things the music service does better than any other, but adoption rates have been less than what Google would have wanted. When Google Music launched (now titled Google Play Music, Music Play, whatever), the service’s store failed to have all of the major labels (Warner Music Group). In fact, the service still fails to feature Warner Music Group. It seems not everyone was convinced it would be a success. So far, it’s still hard to tell.

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RUMOR: Jelly Beans in June? Android 5.0 with a Surprise Release Date

If you’ve had an Android device for longer than a year, chances are you’ve grown accustomed to waiting. What I mean is you’ve probably waited, waited, and waited some more for the latest mobile OS. Chances are that by the time you’ve received something close to the latest rendition of Android, the next update is probably right around the corner. Well, a new rumor is circulating that Jelly Bean (Android 5.0) could be closer to release than initially thought. How close? Try Google’s I/O Developer Conference in June. Continue reading