New Moto X Video Surfaces: Why I’ll Probably Ditch My Nexus 4

motox-adLeaks continue to arrive for the Moto X – the new flagship device from the Google-owned Motorola Mobility. The device looks great, and given Google’s surprising and uncommon commitment to marketing the new device – a mere $500 million set aside – one would think Google has plenty to talk about. The bigger question for me, is how the Moto X fits into Android’s Nexus world? The Nexus 4 is nine-months old and most likely set for an update in the fall. But as the Moto X primes for an August launch, it seems odd to have two flagship devices – a new Nexus 4 and the Moto X – both delivered from Google and both with pure Android. Continue reading

Why Google Play Edition Android Devices May Be a Waste of Time

Google Play EditionRewind a year or two ago and offering devices originally running TouchWiz, HTC Sense or Motoblur with “pure” Android instead made sense. Android was as fragmented as you could get and its Nexus line lacked awareness and market share. Even today, only four percent of users run the latest version of Jelly Bean (Android 4.2), with the majority running Gingerbread (36.5 percent), a two-year old version of Android. But unlike two-years ago, something has dramatically changed regarding how Google provides updates. Continue reading

Why Google Play’s Suite of Apps Need to be Available for iOS

Play MusicAndroid is a platform that keeps users in the Google universe – but Android does not necessarily make money on its own for Google. In fact, whether you own a Nexus device or something different, Google is probably less concerned with individual device sales and more focused on how each device operates in connection with Google Play and its other services across a wide market share – because that’s where the money is. This is why Google should focus Google Play and its apps (Play Music, Books, Magazines, and Movies & TV) in iOS’s direction.
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3 Features Google Music Needs to Fix to Compete with iTunes

Google is trying desperately to get you to use their music service – which has been available for over a year now and out of Beta for seven months. There are several things the music service does better than any other, but adoption rates have been less than what Google would have wanted. When Google Music launched (now titled Google Play Music, Music Play, whatever), the service’s store failed to have all of the major labels (Warner Music Group). In fact, the service still fails to feature Warner Music Group. It seems not everyone was convinced it would be a success. So far, it’s still hard to tell.

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6 Reasons why Google Music is Better than iTunes

Is it just me or is Google’s under performing music service “Google Music” one of the company’s best kept secrets? Many, if you told them about the service, have probably never even heard of it or have no idea what differentiates the service from say iTunes. And most if they ever did, would probably react with eye rolls and sighs. So for the digital laggards out there who say, “I already have iTunes, what’s the point to getting Google Music?” Here are six benefits you can’t get with iTunes. Continue reading