New Moto X Video Surfaces: Why I’ll Probably Ditch My Nexus 4

motox-adLeaks continue to arrive for the Moto X – the new flagship device from the Google-owned Motorola Mobility. The device looks great, and given Google’s surprising and uncommon commitment to marketing the new device – a mere $500 million set aside – one would think Google has plenty to talk about. The bigger question for me, is how the Moto X fits into Android’s Nexus world? The Nexus 4 is nine-months old and most likely set for an update in the fall. But as the Moto X primes for an August launch, it seems odd to have two flagship devices – a new Nexus 4 and the Moto X – both delivered from Google and both with pure Android. Continue reading

Why Google Play Edition Android Devices May Be a Waste of Time

Google Play EditionRewind a year or two ago and offering devices originally running TouchWiz, HTC Sense or Motoblur with “pure” Android instead made sense. Android was as fragmented as you could get and its Nexus line lacked awareness and market share. Even today, only four percent of users run the latest version of Jelly Bean (Android 4.2), with the majority running Gingerbread (36.5 percent), a two-year old version of Android. But unlike two-years ago, something has dramatically changed regarding how Google provides updates. Continue reading

Apple’s WWDC a Hit or Miss Depending on What Side You’re Standing On

iOS 7You know when you have a demo for Safari it’s going to be a bad day.

Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) has become Christmas morning for many Apple fans over the years, but the luster normally associated with the event has dwindled in recent years. Today was a chance for Apple to prove to the tech community that they still had it. So did they pull it off? Sort of. Continue reading

With iOS 7 Apple Needs to Change its Philosophy

WWDC 2013Apple needs to prove that it can still wow us – even the average Apple user will tell you this. But tomorrow’s Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) keynote will be about much more than software or hardware – it’s about a philosophy. With the long-awaited iOS 7 redesign and iRadio looming, there will still likely be one important feature missing within these products: making them available for everyone. Apple’s closed philosophy has served it well over the years, but other competitors such as Google, have made their apps available on iOS. Google knows that it can’t win the mobile war by ignoring iOS – the same is especially true of Apple regarding Android’s more than 70 percent market share. Android is just too big to ignore and Apple needs to embrace it. Continue reading

Google Babel is an Overdue Remediation to Google’s Fragmented Messaging

talk_logoI’ve written about Google’s fragmented messaging service before, but it’s still surprising that Google lingers behind other services such as Facebook Messages and Apple iMessages when they lead with other services like Gmail. Part of Google’s failure is the missed opportunity with Android, which claims 70 percent of the global smartphone market share. The other piece to their failure is that many features showcased from other apps (Facebook Messenger, iMessages) are already provided by Google – just spread across multiple services. This is why it’s encouraging to hear about the rumored “Google Babel,” which very well could resolve many, if not all, of the present problems within Google’s various messaging apps and services. Continue reading

The Failed Google+ Ghost Town Argument

TechCrunchThere’s a resurgence in the old “ghost town” argument surrounding Google+ recently. I’ve seen doubts about monthly interaction estimates, surprise at the lack of panic with Google+’s recent power out, and discredit around Google+’s new application sign-in service. Many of these articles have come from authors who haven’t filled out a Google+ profile and/or barely dabbled with the social network, but still consider themselves authorities on the subject. Now of course people are entitled to their own opinion, but here’s my take on what’s happening with Google+ usability and why so many get it wrong. Continue reading

Chromebook Pixel: Walks Like a Premium Laptop, But Can It Act Like One Too?

ChromebookIf you have a Ferrari, but only dirt roads to drive it on, you don’t drive your Ferrari. This is the challenge for Google’s premium laptop the Chromebook Pixel announced today by Google via a blog post. By the laptop’s very nature, it’s reliant on an Internet infrastructure still missing investments or incentives to increase overall speed. This impacts how much you can rely on the cloud to truly replace your old hard drive for a server, and with most consumer Internet connections rounding out at 15 Mbps – a speed introduced with broadband over a decade ago – Pixel’s main challenge isn’t just Internet speed, it’s apps and price. Continue reading

Why Google Play’s Suite of Apps Need to be Available for iOS

Play MusicAndroid is a platform that keeps users in the Google universe – but Android does not necessarily make money on its own for Google. In fact, whether you own a Nexus device or something different, Google is probably less concerned with individual device sales and more focused on how each device operates in connection with Google Play and its other services across a wide market share – because that’s where the money is. This is why Google should focus Google Play and its apps (Play Music, Books, Magazines, and Movies & TV) in iOS’s direction.
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2012: The Year Google Figured Out Hardware

2012 GoogleRewind six-months ago and you would have found an entirely different Google. From a software perspective, the company still continued to flourish, but from an in-house product line, the company was still missing a blockbuster. Products like the Galaxy Nexus and various Chromebooks came and went – seemingly missing an “it factor” that would grant them lasting power. But as the beginning of the year teased future products like Project Glass, Google I/O was really the pivot point for the company’s hardware alongside its OEM partners. There it unveiled the power of Google Glass, the impressive Nexus 7, and the Nexus Q (currently being reevaluated). Continue reading